Guided Tour: Prehistoric Ireland

Discover the artefacts left behind by Ireland’s earliest people, from the hunter-gathers and the first farmers of the Stone Age to the goldsmiths and warriors of the Bronze Age and find out what insights they can give into the lives and rituals of peoples in the distant past


Tour at a Glance 

Level 1st - 3rd Year, Transition Year 
Group Size Designed for groups of 30 max
Location Prehistoric Ireland Exhibition, Ground Floor, National Museum of Ireland – Archaeology, Kildare Street.
Duration 45 minutes
Days available Tuesdays and Thursdays during term time
Times available 10:30am and 12:00pm
Accessibility This tour is wheelchair accessible. Please advise us of any mobility issues in your class when booking. 

 


 

Curriculum Links 

Junior Cert History

  • The Nature of History
    Working with Evidence / Developing Historical Consciousness / Acquiring ‘the big picture’
  • The History of Ireland
    Key moments of change / Thinking historically- explain the relevance of archaeology to their understanding of Irish history

Junior Cert Geography

  • Strand 3: Exploring People, Place and Change

Statements of Learning for Junior Cert

  • Values local, national and international heritage, understands the importance of the relationship between past and current events and the forces that drive change.
  • Communicates effectively using a variety of means in a range of contexts

Key Skills for Junior Cert

  • Managing information and thinking
  • Communicating
  • Staying well-being positive about learning

Transition Year

  • Teaching methods and approaches
    Study visits and field trips

 


 

Learning Outcomes

  • Gain a greater knowledge of the Mesolithic, Neolithic, and Bronze Age in Ireland
  • See real artefacts created during these time periods
  • Examine how archaeology has contributed to our knowledge of prehistoric Ireland
  • Discover the skills used by people in prehistoric Ireland to survive
  • Explore the social impact of the introduction of farming and metalwork in prehistoric Ireland